Speaking Part 2 Series

IELTS Lessons, written by Sam Morgan and Tom Speed

This is a short introduction to part 2 of the IELTS speaking test.

Exercise 1

Read the following information about part 2 of the speaking test. Are the statements which follow the text true or false?
Part 2 of the Speaking Test
 
The IELTS speaking test has three parts. Part 2 of the speaking test takes roughly three minutes.

First, the examiner will give you piece of paper and a pencil. Then the examiner will give you a topic card that contains the topic which you must speak about. The topic card will contain 4 questions concerning the topic. The examiner will ask you if you understand the topic. At this point you can ask for clarification about the topic or about the timing of part 2. You cannot change the topic and the examiner is not allowed to help you by explaining the vocabulary.

Next, you have one minute to make a plan. You should use the pencil and paper to make some notes to help you when you are speaking. Most candidates feel a bit embarrassed and nervous when they have to speak for two minutes and this can cause them to forget what they want to say. If you make notes about your main points and some of the good higher level vocabulary that you want to use, then even if you feel nervous and forget what you want to say, you can use your notes to guide you and still do well.

It is very important to make good use of the one-minute preparation time. Use the four questions on the cue card to help you think of ideas and vocabulary.

After the one minute of preparation time, the examiner will tell you to start speaking. As you speak, the examiner will be considering the band for your fluency, lexis (vocabulary), grammatical range and accuracy, and pronunciation. Each of the four areas is equal in importance for your speaking band score.

The four questions on the topic card are to guide you, don’t worry if you don’t answer all of them because this will not affect your score.

If you don’t speak for long enough, the examiner will ask you to continue speaking. If you are still speaking at the end of the two minutes, the examiner will politely ask you to stop. Don’t be worried if the examiner asks you to stop, this is normal procedure as no candidate is allowed more than two minuets to speak.

​Usually the examiner will ask you a follow up question which is connected to what you were talking about. After this, the examiner will take the paper, pencil and cue card from you and then move on to part 3 of the speaking test. The topic of part 2 and part 3 of the IELTS speaking test are always closely connected.

1. Part 2 of the speaking test takes 4 minutes.
2. You must bring your own pencil to the speaking test.
3. The examiner will give you a topic card which contains the topic which you must talk about.
4. If you don’t like the topic you can ask the examiner for a different one.
5. The examiner will explain any words on the topic card which you do not understand.
6. There are four questions on the topic card.
7. Note down any main ideas or high level, interesting vocabulary which you want to use.
8. You must answer each of the four questions when you speak.
9. As you speak the examiner will be considering your score for fluency, lexis, grammatical range and accuracy, and pronunciation.
10. Accurate grammar is more important than fluency, lexis or pronunciation.
11. If you do not speak for long enough, the examiner will ask you to continue speaking.
12. The examiner will allow you to talk for as long as you want.
13. The examiner usually asks a follow up question when you finish.
14. You can keep the topic card when you leave the test.
15. Part 2 and part 3 of the IELTS speaking test are about the same or a very similar topic.